Antibiotic use statistics prove misleading

The oft-cited statistic that 80 percent of antibiotics sold in the United States are used in animals is highly misleading, says Richard Raymond, MD, former undersecretary for food safety at the USDA. Raymond says 28 percent of antibiotics used in animals are ionophores, which have never been approved for use in humans. FULL STORY »

Iowa State researchers awarded grant to study PRRS

The researchers, led by Jack Dekkers, professor of animal science, will seek to identify genes in pigs that make them less susceptible to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). FULL STORY »

Flu activity increases nationwide

Influenza activity continues to increase in the United States which is now experiencing high levels of influenza-like-illness (ILI). And, even though the flu season is now in full force, the National Pork Board (NPB) still recommends producers, farm personnel and others who have contact with pigs get the seasonal flu vaccination. FULL STORY »

USDA issues Final Rule on animal disease traceability

The new rule allows a disease to be brought under control and eradicated more quickly, saving animals – and taxpayer dollars – and keeping foreign markets open to exports, according to the National Pork Producers Council (NPPC). FULL STORY »

Proper heat placement in farrowing facilities critical

Heat placement for young pigs is a critical component for getting animals started quickly and maintaining optimal health. In farrowing facilities, piglets must be kept from becoming chilled, which often leads to scours, more tail-enders, and less healthy, thriving piglets. FULL STORY »

PRRS research focuses on swine genome

Swine genomic markers, phenotypes, chromosomes and genotyping are playing an increasingly important role in the latest efforts against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus. The science of genetics will play a vital role in the development of PRRS-resistant pigs and eventual elimination of the disease. FULL STORY »

Managing weanling pigs without using antibiotic growth promoters

There is a growing market in the U.S. for pork raised without antibiotics, including certified organic pork. A researcher at the University of Illinois has created a resource to help swine producers identify strategies that they can use to manage weanling pigs without using antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs). FULL STORY »

Vitamin D essential in promoting sow health and piglet growth

The changing of seasons may result in seasonal Vitamin D deficiency in sows. Research shows that supplementation of the “sunshine vitamin” becomes especially important in sow performance as the hours of natural sunlight dwindle into winter. FULL STORY »

Swine genome research links importance to human health

The first complete sequence of the pig genome by an international team of researchers, including Iowa State University (Iowa State) animal scientists has provided a genetic comparison of the domesticated pig and its wild cousins and offers clues to how the animal evolved. It also promises to expand the ways pigs are used in human health and medical research FULL STORY »

Approving antibiotics – what’s the problem?

In an era of instant-everything, it’s hard to understand why we can’t develop, research and bring to market new antibiotics for animals that can solve disease issues as well as prevent antibiotic-resistance in the human population. FULL STORY »

U.S. growth downgraded ahead of fiscal cliff

Uncertainty about the "fiscal cliff" of scheduled tax increases and spending cuts prompted analysts this month to cut early 2013 U.S. economic growth expectations, a Reuters poll showed on Thursday. FULL STORY »

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Pulmotil

Pulmotil sets the foundation for nursery-to-finisher health management by controlling respiratory disease associated with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) or Pasteurella multocida ... Read More

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