Triumph Foods has inked a long-term genetics-supply agreement with PIC, Franklin, Kent. Under the contract, Triumph genetics will use PIC-based genetic platforms to support more than 550,000 sows. This represents more about 10 percent of the U.S. breeding-herd population, according to a PIC news release.

The pork production business that make up Triumph Foods includes: The Hanor Company, Christensen Farms, New Fashion Pork, TriOak Foods, Eichelberger Farms and Allied Producers Cooperative. Seaboard Farms, who markets all of Triumph Foods’ pork products, also will source genetics from Triumph Foods.

“By managing our own genetics program and owing our processing plant, Triumph Foods’ producers have a competitive advantage in implementing important genetic changes based on the direct feedback in our system,” notes Myrl Mortenson, senior vice president and managing partner of The Hanor Company. Triumph Foods will use a customized genetics program of PIC male and female lines. The end result will be to use “tools focused specifically on, and directed by, the pork customers’ needs and demands for consistent, high-quality pork products,” he says.

“Our goal is to produce high-quality pork products in an efficient processing plant that has the highest food-safety standards,” says Rick Hoffman, chief executive officer of Triumph Foods. “This genetic supply agreement is an important part in helping us achieve our goal.” He noted that it will help the participating producers focus on high-pork-quality traits such as consistency, leanness, texture, color and intramuscular fat.

PIC officials note that the company’s genetic-services team has worked closely with Triumph Foods “for some time to develop a unique improvement program.” They point out that pigs are being produced today that “will maximize the potential value once Triumph’s plant in St. Joseph, Mo., is online in fall 2005.

PIC