High Condition (Orange) High Risk of Terrorist Attack

Communication

  • Notify producers to increase biosecurity;
  • Contact State or Federal animal health officials for updates on situations, information, or actions needed;
  • Provide brochures at clinics, and provide display posters;
  • Distribute informational brochures to producers and livestock concentration points; and
  • Discuss the situation with employees, and report suspicious packages or telephone calls.

Physical Security

  • Ensure that your clinic and gates are locked when possible;
  • Consider hiring additional security for your veterinary facility if needed; and
  • Lock veterinary vehicles and park them where they can be observed.

Biosecurity

  • Avoid livestock and poultry for at least 10 days after you leave foreign soil;
  • Refrain from wearing items that cannot be successfully disinfected, such as jewelry and watches;
  • Disinfect boots between farm calls;
  • Provide foot baths at your clinic;
  • When possible, disinfect equipment and stalls after use, especially if used for sick animals; and
  • Before leaving a foreign country, launder or dry-clean all clothing and outerwear.  Remove all dirt and soil from shoes by thoroughly cleaning them prior to wiping with a cloth dampened with a bleach solution.  Use a cloth dampened with a bleach solution to wipe luggage and personal items (including watches, cameras, laptops, CD players, and cell phones) if they are soiled.

Monitor

  • Report any signs of disease that might be a foreign animal disease (FAD) immediately to State or Federal Animal Health Officials
  • Report any disease that might be unusual for the geographic area, time of year, or species of animal;
  • Monitor your clinic’s chemical and drug storage areas for tampering or unauthorized entrance;
  • Watch for unusual packages or containers, especially those found in unlikely or sensitive areas such as air intake systems;
  • Verify the source of all incoming animals, feed, supplements, equipment and individuals prior to moving them into the animal area; and
  • Scrutinize deviations from “normal operations.”

Prepare

  • Conduct a clinic vulnerability assessment…..critically evaluate your operation, determine possible areas of vulnerability, and correct them;
  • Review clinical signs of FAD’s and discuss with all employees and clients;
  • Review reporting systems and phone numbers in case of a possible FAD or other emergency – these numbers include those of your State Veterinarian, Federal Area Veterinarian in Charge, local law enforcement, and State and Federal 1-800 hotlines.
  • Post these phone numbers in your clinic and practice vehicle; and
  • Have extra feed and water available (up to a week) for hospitalized animals in the event movement of animals is stopped.

Severe Condition (Red) High Risk of Terrorist Attack.

Engage in the above activities and, in addition, the following are recommended.

Communication

  • Frequently check with State or Federal animal health authorities for information on possible specific threats and mitigation recommendations.

  Physical Security

  • Consider security patrols for your property if indicated; and
  • Post signs at the entrances to your clinic indicating that the operation is under increased surveillance.

Biosecurity

  • Increase vigilance and report any unusual activities;
  • Monitor animals on calls more closely for signs of FAD’s;
  • Disinfect boots, vehicle tires, and equipment as much as possible between farms;
  • Identify possible biosecurity problems to producers; and
  • Encourage producers to minimize the local and interstate movement of animals and conveyances until the threat passes or  a condition reduction is announced.

Monitor

  • Ask producers to call when an animal dies for unknown reasons;
  • Monitor the animals in your clinic more frequently; and
  • Monitor feed, drugs, and chemicals more frequently.

Prepare 

  • Prepare contingency plans in case of attack, quarantines, or stop movement requirements, and review these plans with employees and family; and
  • Review reporting systems and phone numbers in case of a possible FAD or other emergency – these numbers include those of your State Veterinarian, Federal Area Veterinarian in Charge, local law enforcement, and State and Federal 1-800 hotlines.