As consumers, lawmakers and medical professionals increasingly express concerns about antibiotic use in animal agriculture, understanding strategies within the pork industry is more important than ever. Now there are three new brochures to help producers become familiar with the issue and answer questions accurately.

“Antibiotic use is an important component of herd-health programs, and we want to provide concise information that producers can share,” says Liz Wagstrom, DVM, National Pork Board assistant vice president of science and technology. “We’ve written these brochures for lay audiences, from county health and zoning boards to rural neighbors.”

Much of the material stems from NPB’s Take Care: Use Antibiotics Responsibly program, which focuses on animal health and public health. Take Care educates industry professionals, including producers, veterinarians, animal-health companies and feed companies about responsible antibiotic use and assures consumers, lawmakers and medical professionals that the right steps are being taken.

Here’s a snapshot of the new brochures:

  • “Take Care: Use Antibiotics Responsibly, Frequently Asked Questions” is a quick primer on NPB’s Take Care program to answer frequently asked questions about the industry’s responsible use of antibiotics. The brochure describes the program, its relevance to the industry, how it was developed, guidelines and principles.
  • “The Danish Experience” This brochure explains what happened when Denmark banned the subtherapeutic use of antibiotic growth promotants in pork production. You will learn why growth promotants were banned, the result of the ban, whether antibiotic use in animals actually declined, and the ban’s impact on human health.
  • •“Antibiotic Use in Pork Production, Frequently Asked Questions” This explains the use of antibiotics in the pork industry. It is an excellent resource to help combat common misperceptions about antibiotic use and risks related to pork production.

For more information or to get copies, call (800) 456-7675, or go to www.pork.org.